What Will it Take to Restore Historic Carbon County Building?

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For quite some time, the Carbon County Commissioners have been in discussion as to the fate of the former Price Tavern and senior citizen center. Currently, the building serves as the location for the Boys & Girls Club, which has met with officials to discuss moving, even temporarily.

Carbon County has owned the building since 1935 and has utilized it in a number of ways. A recent safety audit report given by the Utah Local Governments Trust stated that, because of historical value, the original 1911 building may be worthy of preservation; however, it requires significant repairs and restoration to address hazards and prevent further deterioration. The second floor in particular has many open holes and a large amount of exposed wood structure, as well as combustible salvage.

“Because of historical value, the original 1911 building may be worthy of preservation but requires significant repairs and restoration to address hazards and prevent further deterioration,” the audit reported stated. “The single level building that has been added on the rear has significant damage from a failed roof in addition to other serious condition problems due to abuse and lack of maintenance.”

Rotten soffit, damaged siding, failed roof annex, water damage, dry rot and more were also outlined in the audit report.

“Buildings must be maintained in a safe and healthy condition to prevent injury, illness and property damage,” the audit report stated. “These and other condition problems are contributing to, or may contribute, to damage, injury or other loss resulting from trips, falls, cuts, punctures, infection, mold, mildews, rodent infestation, insect infestation, continued rot, continued water damage, etc.”

It was explained that the building, to be compliant with the fire code, must be protected by an internal fire suppression system. The report also recommends that structural deficiencies be mitigated or demolition of damaged parts of the building be considered.

“[The] second floor has many open holes and a large amount of exposed wood structure and combustible salvage,” the audit report reads. “Openings in the floor would allow fire to travel between floor and spread across the building rapidly. [The] amount of exposed wood structure and salvage would allow a fire to grow and spread rapidly. [The] building has a high combustible load with no fire suppression system.”

The county commissioners recognize the history of the building and stated that it is not their desire to demolish the building. A public process was conducted and interested parties were invited to tour the building and submit a proposal in order to purchase and renovate the building. Unfortunately, the commissioners did not receive any bids.

The major repairs that would need to be done to the building include, but are not limited to, electrical, plumbing, heating, insulating and replacing the windows, all of which come at too high of a cost for the county to take on at this time. It was stated that waiting for another year is not wise, as another winter would significantly further the existing damage.

At this time, a definite cost for the complete restoration of the building has not been determined.

Individuals that may be interested in purchasing and renovating the building would first need an engineer report. All designs would need to be submitted along with the blueprints of what must be done. The commissioners announced a deadline of April 1 for interested parties to act. Those that are interested in viewing the building for purchasing possibilities may contact the commissioners at (435) 636-3226.

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